Swings and roundabouts: surprising fashion trends making a comeback

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It’s a well known adage that fashion flows through cycles and circles, but there are always certain looks that everyone is glad to see the back of – and some of the latest trends may just be in that category.

With the recent influx of nostalgic television shows that highlight the best and worst – or sometimes are just a downright caricature of an era (ahem, looking at you Stranger Things) – it’s no surprise that some looks are coming back to bite. The industry experts have dug deep and pegged some infamous classics that are set to move right back on trend. This list lays them out in order so you can see just how far you’re time travelling.

MINI HEMLINES – 1960s
A sweet statement dress with a cheeky hemline is always in. However, the shape of these new minis offered on several fall runways are so reminiscent of their iconic 1960s counterparts that you’d be forgiven for thinking it was the summer of 69’. It must be said, the playfully bold return to a bare leg is a welcome sight after a long in-trend season of leisurewear street wear.















BRAIDS ARE BACK – 1970s
The 1970s loved a braid. A tapering, plaited rope down past your waist? That’s the stuff. Models walking for Tory Burch, Prada, and Chromat this year may have spiced up the throwback a little, but the sentiment is there. Braids are back baby, however you like them.

EVERYDAY COUTURE- 1980s
In stark contrast to the soft, earthy colours and cloths of the 1970s, the 1980s were synonymous with flashy taste. Even better? Wearing it in every vivid shade possible so nobody missed the fact you were rocking Givenchy. And apparently, obnoxiously everyday couture is back in, with an emphasis on supersized proportions, intricate detailing, feathers and lace.

CRIMPED HAIR – 1990s
Hello old friend, I hoped we’d never meet again. But alas, here you are on the fashion scene again. The crimp has graced us once again, although depending which stylist you’re looking at the good news can vary. Oscar de la Renta showed us that the crimp is back but with one rule, it must be outlandishly BIGGER.